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Trump calls Gianforte's victory a 'great win in Montana'

Trump calls Gianforte's victory a 'great win in Montana'

President Donald Trump did not elaborate any further on his remark. | AP Photo

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Today in Trumpworld -- May 26

TRUMP’S SCHEDULE: President Donald Trump is in Sicily, Italy for the G-7. He held a bilateral meeting on Friday morning with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, participated in a welcome ceremony for G-7 leaders and participated in a luncheon and working sessions. Tonight, he will attend a dinner hosted by Italian President Sergio Mattarella.

OTHER HAPPENINGS: Vice President Mike Pence will deliver the commencement address at the Naval Academy at 10 a.m.

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TRUMP AT THE G-7: From POLITICO’s Louis Nelson: “President Donald Trump said Friday at his bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe that the ‘big problem’ of North Korea’s ambitions for a nuclear weapon will be dealt with, telling reporters that ‘you can bet on that.’ Trump was back in Italy Friday morning for the second time this week, this time in Sicily for a meeting of the G-7 world leaders, as part of his eight-day, multi-nation international trip. The president’s met with Abe, with whom he met and played golf at Mar-a-Lago earlier this year, ahead of the day’s slate of larger G-7 meetings.”

TRUMP AND NATO: From the New York Times’ Michael D. Shear, Mark Landler and James Kanter: “President Trump on Thursday punctured any illusions that he was on a fence-mending tour of Europe, declining to explicitly endorse NATO’s mutual defense pledge and lashing out at fellow members for what he called their ‘chronic underpayments’ to the alliance. On a tense day when Mr. Trump brought the “America first” themes of his presidential campaign to the very heart of Europe, he left European leaders visibly unsettled, with some openly lamenting divisions with the United States on trade, climate and the best way to confront Russia. The discord was palpable even in body language. When Mr. Trump greeted Emmanuel Macron, France’s new president, they grabbed each other’s hands, jaws clenched, in an extended grip that turned Mr. Trump’s knuckles white. When the leaders lined up to pose for the traditional photograph at NATO headquarters, Mr. Trump appeared to push aside the Montenegrin prime minister, Dusko Markovic, to get to his assigned place in the front. The split was starkest at NATO headquarters, where Mr. Trump used the dedication of a soaring new building to lecture allies on their financial contributions. Far from robustly reaffirming NATO’s mutual defense commitment in the way that many members hoped he would, Mr. Trump repeated his complaint that the United States was shouldering an unfair burden.”

MORE RUSSIA NEWS: From The Washington Post’s Matt Zapotosky, Sari Horwitz, Devlin Barrett and Adam Entous: “Investigators are focusing on a series of meetings held by Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and an influential White House adviser, as part of their probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and related matters, according to people familiar with the investigation. Kushner, who held meetings in December with the Russian ambassador and a banker from Moscow, is being investigated because of the extent and nature of his interactions with the Russians, the people

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Senate Dems eyeing 2020 tell Trump ‘hell no’

A mong Senate Democrats’ broad opposition to President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, six stand out in having voted against nearly all of his nominees — and each senator just happens to be a potential Trump challenger in 2020.

The Democrats’ latest hell-no caucus includes Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Kamala Harris of California, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Jeff Merkley of Oregon and Vermont independent Bernie Sanders, according to a POLITICO analysis of votes on 35 Trump nominees confirmed this year.

With the Senate having taken up virtually no major legislation as it nears its sixth month in session, these votes offer the best clue to who are positioning themselves as leaders of a party eager to take the fight to Trump.

Among Senate Democrats, Gillibrand has taken the most aggressive stance toward Trump's nominees, only voting for only a single one — though other potential 2020 contenders weren't far behind.

The hell-no Democrats brush off suggestions that future political prospects play into their decision to resist even lower-level Trump picks, including Rod Rosenstein as the second-ranking official at the Justice Department and former Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad as U.S. ambassador to China.

But all six senators are often on the party’s short lists to challenge Trump in 2020, and they’ve all cemented their following among the liberal grass roots by mounting such a fierce opposition to his nominees.

“Lost in all of the obvious concern about Russia is the fact that Trump is pushing an extremely, extremely right-wing, reactionary agenda: tax breaks for billionaires, throwing 24 million people off health insurance, and massive cuts to programs that working people need,” Sanders said in a brief interview. “And many of his appointees are pushing exactly that agenda, and I’m not going to support that.”

Lost in all of the obvious concern about Russia is the fact that Trump is pushing an extremely, extremely right-wing, reactionary agenda. … I’m not going to support that. – Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT)

Of the 35 nominees included in POLITICO’s analysis, Gillibrand supported just one, Warren backed two and Booker and Harris gave their endorsement to three. Sanders, who ran for the Democratic presidential nomination last year, supported four Trump nominees while Merkley backed six. (Harris and Sanders both missed a confirmation vote each that could affect their totals.)

POLITICO’s analysis did not consider three nominees confirmed unanimously: Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin and two members of the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

Few Democrats have the platform to showcase their opposition to Trump like members of the Senate, who have the power to filibuster legislation and give their imprimatur to hundreds of nominees across the administration. But this year’s resistant bloc of liberals stands out even among a deeply recalcitrant Democratic Caucus, which waged the first partisan filibuster of a Supreme Court candidate in history and launched numerous other wars over nominees — winning plaudits from a restless base that’s urging lawmakers to oppose Trump at every turn. In an interview, Harris also

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Senate Dems eyeing 2020 tell Trump ‘hell no’

A mong Senate Democrats’ broad opposition to President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, six stand out in having voted against nearly all of his nominees — and each senator just happens to be a potential Trump challenger in 2020.

The Democrats’ latest hell-no caucus includes Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Kamala Harris of California, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Jeff Merkley of Oregon and Vermont independent Bernie Sanders, according to a POLITICO analysis of votes on 35 Trump nominees confirmed this year.

With the Senate having taken up virtually no major legislation as it nears its sixth month in session, these votes offer the best clue to who are positioning themselves as leaders of a party eager to take the fight to Trump.

Among Senate Democrats, Gillibrand has taken the most aggressive stance toward Trump's nominees, only voting for only a single one — though other potential 2020 contenders weren't far behind.

The hell-no Democrats brush off suggestions that future political prospects play into their decision to resist even lower-level Trump picks, including Rod Rosenstein as the second-ranking official at the Justice Department and former Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad as U.S. ambassador to China.

But all six senators are often on the party’s short lists to challenge Trump in 2020, and they’ve all cemented their following among the liberal grass roots by mounting such a fierce opposition to his nominees.

“Lost in all of the obvious concern about Russia is the fact that Trump is pushing an extremely, extremely right-wing, reactionary agenda: tax breaks for billionaires, throwing 24 million people off health insurance, and massive cuts to programs that working people need,” Sanders said in a brief interview. “And many of his appointees are pushing exactly that agenda, and I’m not going to support that.”

Lost in all of the obvious concern about Russia is the fact that Trump is pushing an extremely, extremely right-wing, reactionary agenda. … I’m not going to support that. – Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT)

Of the 35 nominees included in POLITICO’s analysis, Gillibrand supported just one, Warren backed two and Booker and Harris gave their endorsement to three. Sanders, who ran for the Democratic presidential nomination last year, supported four Trump nominees while Merkley backed six. (Harris and Sanders both missed a confirmation vote each that could affect their totals.)

POLITICO’s analysis did not consider three nominees confirmed unanimously: Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin and two members of the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

Few Democrats have the platform to showcase their opposition to Trump like members of the Senate, who have the power to filibuster legislation and give their imprimatur to hundreds of nominees across the administration. But this year’s resistant bloc of liberals stands out even among a deeply recalcitrant Democratic Caucus, which waged the first partisan filibuster of a Supreme Court candidate in history and launched numerous other wars over nominees — winning plaudits from a restless base that’s urging lawmakers to oppose Trump at every turn. In an interview, Harris also

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Trump with Abe: 'You can bet' North Korea's nuclear problem will be dealt with

Shinzo Abe and Donald Trump.

President Donald Trump meets with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during the G7 Summit, Friday. | AP

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