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The importance of a good night's sleep

May 25, 2017, 6:48 PM

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Mom's video of child paralyzed after tick bite goes viral

One Oregon couple's video of their young daughter suddenly experiencing paralysis has gone viral after the child's mother posted the frightening moments on Facebook.

In a Facebook post, Amanda Lewis described how her 3-year-old daughter, Evelyn, became fussy after a bath on May 13 and didn't want to stand up.

"Evelyn started acting a little weird last night around bedtime. She didn't want to stand up after her bath to get into her pajamas. I helped her and got her in bed. She was a little fussy last night and I ended up sleeping in bed with her all night," Lewis wrote.

The next morning, the little girl was still having a hard time standing.

"She could barely walk, or crawl, and could hardly use her arms," Lewis added.

We had a little bit of a scary morning today...luckily everything is ok but I wanted to share this so the rest of you are aware. Evelyn started acting a little weird last night around bed time. She didn't want to stand up after her bath to get into her pajamas. I helped her and got her in bed. She was a little fussy last night and I ended up sleeping in bed with her all night. This morning she was having a hard time standing. She could barely walk, or crawl, and could hardly use her arms. We took some video this morninh to send to family to see if they had any idea what could be going on. We decided to take her into the ER right after we took this video because her symptoms were getting worse, and given Lantz's history with cancer we were quite concerned. We got into a room quickly, thank God, and were seen almost right away. The doctor talked to us for a minute and said over the past 15 years he had seen about 7 or 8 children her age with identical symptoms and more than likely she had a tick. They looked her over, combed through her hair really well and sure enough found a tick hiding in her hair. This condition is called tick paralysis. It can affect dogs also and can be fatal. I'm glad we took her in when we did and that it wasn't something worse and that we found it before it got worse. The ticks are out like crazy right now in this area so if your children or dogs start acting a little off, check them thoroughly for ticks! I feel awful for not having seen the little bugger sooner but I never would have even thought to look for a tick. It's crazy that a little bug can do this! We're still in the ER. Now that the tick has been removed, Evelyn should start feeling like herself in a couple of hours. She's enjoying popsicles and watching cartoons ☺ They want to monitor her for a little longer then we can go home Crazy morning UPDATE: I didn't realize how widespread this video would end up! So for those of you
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Mom's video of child paralyzed after tick bite goes viral

One Oregon couple's video of their young daughter suddenly experiencing paralysis has gone viral after the child's mother posted the frightening moments on Facebook.

In a Facebook post, Amanda Lewis described how her 3-year-old daughter, Evelyn, became fussy after a bath on May 13 and didn't want to stand up.

"Evelyn started acting a little weird last night around bedtime. She didn't want to stand up after her bath to get into her pajamas. I helped her and got her in bed. She was a little fussy last night and I ended up sleeping in bed with her all night," Lewis wrote.

The next morning, the little girl was still having a hard time standing.

"She could barely walk, or crawl, and could hardly use her arms," Lewis added.

We had a little bit of a scary morning today...luckily everything is ok but I wanted to share this so the rest of you are aware. Evelyn started acting a little weird last night around bed time. She didn't want to stand up after her bath to get into her pajamas. I helped her and got her in bed. She was a little fussy last night and I ended up sleeping in bed with her all night. This morning she was having a hard time standing. She could barely walk, or crawl, and could hardly use her arms. We took some video this morninh to send to family to see if they had any idea what could be going on. We decided to take her into the ER right after we took this video because her symptoms were getting worse, and given Lantz's history with cancer we were quite concerned. We got into a room quickly, thank God, and were seen almost right away. The doctor talked to us for a minute and said over the past 15 years he had seen about 7 or 8 children her age with identical symptoms and more than likely she had a tick. They looked her over, combed through her hair really well and sure enough found a tick hiding in her hair. This condition is called tick paralysis. It can affect dogs also and can be fatal. I'm glad we took her in when we did and that it wasn't something worse and that we found it before it got worse. The ticks are out like crazy right now in this area so if your children or dogs start acting a little off, check them thoroughly for ticks! I feel awful for not having seen the little bugger sooner but I never would have even thought to look for a tick. It's crazy that a little bug can do this! We're still in the ER. Now that the tick has been removed, Evelyn should start feeling like herself in a couple of hours. She's enjoying popsicles and watching cartoons ☺ They want to monitor her for a little longer then we can go home Crazy morning UPDATE: I didn't realize how widespread this video would end up! So for those of you
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Less than 6 hours of sleep could raise serious risk

A new

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Alzheimer's deaths are skyrocketing

Deaths from Alzheimer's disease have risen dramatically in recent years, new government health data shows, and more Americans are dying from the illness at home.

Over a 16-year period, between 1999 and 2014, death rates from Alzheimer's disease increased almost 55 percent, according to findings published Thursday in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report .

"We've known for some time that the number of Alzheimer's disease deaths have been going up and that can in some way be attributed to the fact that we have a growing number of aging adults in America. Age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease," report author Christopher Taylor, an epidemiologist with the CDC, told CBS News.

During that same time period, Taylor said an increasing percentage of people with the illness died at home instead of in medical facilities, a shift from years past.

The majority of Alzheimer's deaths took place in a nursing home or longterm care facility, but that figure declined from 67.5 percent in 1999 to just over 54 percent in 2014. Alzheimer's deaths in hospitals dropped from 14.7 percent to just 6.6 percent.

About a quarter of Alzheimer's patients spent their final days at home in 2014, up from about 13.9 percent in 1999. 

" Caregiving for someone with Alzheimer's disease , especially in the late stages, it's very intense. We believe there is a need for more caregivers and they should be getting more resources for such intense caregiving," Taylor said.

According to the Alzheimer's Association, 5.5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease today , and that number has been increasing over the past decade as the U.S. population ages, said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs at the Alzheimer's Association.

"This is a continuation of a trend that's been going on for quite some time. It didn't happen in one year, it's been a steady trend over time, this increase in the death rate. This is not a surprise, but it's alarming," Fargo told CBS News.

How fast the disease progresses varies from person to person. The illness may follow a rapid course or progress more slowly over five or more years. For families and friends caring for a patient, it can take a huge emotional and financial toll, and the new findings reflect an increased burden on those caregivers, said Fargo.

"For every person with Alzheimer's disease, there are three unpaid caregivers, usually family members, sometimes friends as well. We know that it's bad for their own health. We can see that in Medicare data, across the U.S., Alzheimer's caregivers have $9 billion more in Medicare claims for their own health. It takes a toll on caregiver health," said Fargo.

Alzheimer's physician Dr. Paul Wright, chair of neurology at North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center, in New York, told CBS News that many of his patients come in with family and friends who are helping to care for them.

"When I see my patients, it's

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